Overview:Hot Potato: How Washington and New York Gave Birth to Black Basketball and Changed America's Game Forever - In a nation distinguished by a great black athletic heritage, there is perhaps no sport that has felt the impact of African American culture more than basketball. Most people assume that the rise of black basketball was a fortuitous accident of the inner-city playgrounds. In Hot Potato, Bob Kuska shows that it was in fact a consciously organized movement with very specific goals. When Edwin Henderson introduced the game to Washington, D.C., in 1907, he envisioned basketball not as an end in itself but as a public-health and civil-rights tool. Henderson believed that, by organizing black athletics, including basketball, it would be possible to send more outstanding black student athletes to excel at northern white colleges and debunk negative stereotypes of the race. He reasoned that in sports, unlike politics and business, the black race would get a fair chance to succeed. Henderson chose basketball as his marquee sport, and he soon found that the game was a big hit on Washington's segregated U Street. Almost simultaneously, black basketball was catching on quickly in New York, and the book establishes that these two cities served as the birthplace of the black game. Hot Potato chronicles the many successes and failures of the early years of black amateur basketball. It also recounts the emergence of black college basketball in America, documenting the origins of the Colored Intercollegiate Athletic Association, or CIAA, which would become the Big Ten of black collegiate sports. The book also details for the first time the rise of black professional basketball in America, with a particular emphasis on the New York Renaissance, a team considered by experts to be as important in the development of black basketball as the Harlem Globetrotters. Kuska recounts the Renaissance's first victory over the white world champion Original Celtics in 1925, and he evaluates the significance of this win in advancing equality in American sports. By the late 1920s, the Renaissance became one of the sport's top draws in white and black America alike, setting the stage for the team's undisputed world championship in 1939. As Edwin Henderson had hoped -- and as any fan of the modern-day game can tell you -- the triumphs certainly did not end there.

This book is on page /47df93bdff6ee0e8dc5bc4a08409d9a8/book/1603725649-9780813922638. It was written by the following authors: Bob Kuska. Book Hot Potato: How Washington and New York Gave Birth to Black Basketball and Changed America's Game Forever, which can be read online, published by the company: University of Virginia Press. Other books on similar topics can be found in sections: Politics, Sports Books, Education, Society. The book was published on 2004-03-29 00:00:00. It has 240 pages and is published in Hardback format and weight 508 g. File for download Hot Potato: How Washington and New York Gave Birth to Black Basketball and Changed America's Game Forever has PDF format and is called hot-potato-how-washington-and-new-york-gave-birth-to-black-basketball-and-changed-americas-game-forever.pdf. Other books you can download below. Our ilciancino.it site is not responsible for the content of PDF files.


How to download book Hot Potato: How Washington and New York Gave Birth to Black Basketball and Changed America's Game Forever?

1. Select the button you need.
2. Go to the file view page.
3. The link to the file will be available if you are logged into your account.
4. If you don't have an account, click Subscribe.
5. Enjoy your favorite book.

Related
  • Books Download
  • eBooks PDF
  • Books PDF
  • Read Books